The Secrets That Antique Jewelry Keep

We’re always pleased when jewelry reveals some of it secrets through hallmarks, maker’s marks and engraved details. However, some jewelry are meant to keep secrets; artisans have built compartments to protect the wearer’s valuables and tokens of significance, and encase them in some seriously fabulous materials.

 19th Century Etruscan Revival coach covers, from the Gray & Davis archives.

19th Century Etruscan Revival coach covers, from the Gray & Davis archives.

 Coach cover with the old mine cut diamond earring it encased, from the Gray & Davis archives.

Coach cover with the old mine cut diamond earring it encased, from the Gray & Davis archives.

Fashionable and functional in the 19th century, “Coach covers” are attachable orbs that cloaked valuable earrings to protect the wearer in transit (we assume from villainous highwaymen). Once the wearer arrived at her destination, she could remove the covers and let her diamonds out.

 A 15K gold brooch pendant with its original pin and catch made c. 1860.

A 15K gold brooch pendant with its original pin and catch made c. 1860.

 The brooch pendant's secret locket compartment, now fitted with a piece of brocade. 

The brooch pendant's secret locket compartment, now fitted with a piece of brocade. 

Jewelry that incorporated a loved one’s hair became popular in the seventeenth century and remained in fashion until the end of the nineteenth century. Pieces could be given as both a sentimental gesture (Queen Victoria gave hair jewelry throughout her life) or included as part of mourning jewelry to further personalize the token of remembrance. Jewelry with a glass plate built in, as well as some daintier antique lockets, most likely held beautifully woven hair; period jewelers were skilled at braiding and working it into compartments of brooches, pendants and rings.

 A 15K rosy gold locket ring with a buckle design and hand engraving, made c.1830.

A 15K rosy gold locket ring with a buckle design and hand engraving, made c.1830.

 Buckle ring hides woven hair around the band's center.

Buckle ring hides woven hair around the band's center.

Small ring compartments may have held other secrets besides hair. Rings crafted with a small lidded compartment for herbs, or something more sinister, are mentioned in ancient texts. Famous locket ring wearers included Elizabeth I and members of the powerful Borgia family. The ring’s use in fictional and real life drama buoyed their popularity in the 16th through 19th centuries.

 Victorian 15K gold and banded agate men's intaglio ring with locket compartment.

Victorian 15K gold and banded agate men's intaglio ring with locket compartment.

Larger locket pendants became fashionable c. 1860-1880, coinciding with increasing availability of portrait photography – for the first time, images could be created and mounted into jewelry that didn’t require the skill of a miniature portrait painter. Today, with the help of image resizing, we can put pictures into those small jewelry compartments so they may once again hold treasured mementos.

 French 18K gold Georgian locket with carved Garnet and scalloped edge of rose cut diamonds, c.1800. Rock crystal locket backing.

French 18K gold Georgian locket with carved Garnet and scalloped edge of rose cut diamonds, c.1800. Rock crystal locket backing.

 Early 20th Century 14K gold locket watch fob with black enamel and a spider design set with an old mine cut diamond.

Early 20th Century 14K gold locket watch fob with black enamel and a spider design set with an old mine cut diamond.

 Victorian 18K rose gold watch chain is hung with a shield-shaped locket containing a hinged disk of rock crystal. French Import mark c. 1838 - 1864. 

Victorian 18K rose gold watch chain is hung with a shield-shaped locket containing a hinged disk of rock crystal. French Import mark c. 1838 - 1864. 

Antique Baby Rings for Grown Ups

Some of the most adorable items we come across in our antique jewelry searches have to be Victorian baby rings.

Back before things like choking hazards were really worried about, parents would dress up their infants and toddlers in miniature jewels made specifically for children. 

A brief foray into the world of Mom Blogs told us that today public opinion is generally against putting rings on babies, but that’s ok because it means us adults can coopt these baby rings for our own purposes.

Here are our three favorite ways to incorporate antique baby rings into your grown-up jewelry box:

1. Midi-rings!

Many of these baby rings are just the right size to be worn as midi, or “first knuckle” rings.  An old ring that perfectly fits a new trend!

2. Charm-ing Pendants!

This lovely gift idea speaks for itself.

3. Wallet-Friendly Engagement Rings!

We are big proponents of sticking to a price point that’s comfortable when buying an engagement ring, because getting engaged should be something that is 100% fun and wonderful and 0% stressful. Since antique baby rings are made with small gems and/or amounts metal, they tend to be super affordable! Of course, we can always size them up to fit your grown up finger. 

Antique French Reliquary Pendant

We recently acquired a beautiful rose gold watch chain hung with an unusual locket fob. 

 18k rose gold locket and watch chain. European, c. 1850. 

18k rose gold locket and watch chain. European, c. 1850. 

French import marks date the piece’s manufacture rather specifically to the 30 year period between 1838 – 1864.  The front is decorated with a simple, attractive pattern of dots. 

The back is where things get interesting: it’s pierced all the way through with an intricate vine-like design. 

Inside, is a thick slice of rock crystal that swivels on a hinge. At first glance it appears the rock crystal is simply a protective lens for a photograph or portrait, but a closer look at the internal workings of the locket shows that it really wasn’t meant to function that way.  

Our best guess as to the meaning behind this unique arrangement? The locket was likely used as a sort of talisman to bring luck or protection to its wearer. According to G.F. Kunz, rock crystal was traditionally believed to protect the wearer from the Evil Eye and bad dreams. The pierced openings in the back of the locket would allow the wearer to have more contact with the stone, thus increasing its effectiveness. Originally there may have been additional material stored within the locket as well – a piece of hair, a written prayer, or even the relic of a saint.  

We always love learning about the past lives of the jewels that come across our path, but it’s especially exciting to come across a piece that might have magical powers.  

From the Gray & Davis Archives

Below are a few of the fabulous jewels of Gray & Davis past. We’re glad these pieces went to good homes, but that doesn’t mean we can’t reminisce!

From top to bottom:

- An elegant Art Nouveau dinner ring in 18k yellow gold and diamonds

- Classic Art Deco diamond engagement ring with baguette step-down

- Late Victorian/Edwardian onyx portrait cameo

- Exquisitely engraved Edwardian platinum and diamond ring

- Victorian ring with three turquoises & rose cut diamond details

- Antique cluster earrings with rose cut diamonds

- A fun two-tone locket with diamond in mariners' star setting

- Matched pair of sapphire eternity bands, c. 1930

Silver Jewelry & the Aesthetic Movement

During the nineteenth century jewelry designers (and all the other sorts of designers, for that matter) were obsessed with historical revival styles. Classical, Gothic, Renaissance, Egyptian, you name it the Victorians revived it. While we love finding these revival pieces today (Etruscan Revival, anyone?), some Victorians started to get sick of re-hashing old styles and longed for design that was fresh, new and original. These people became followers of what came to be called the Aesthetic Movement, which celebrated ‘art for art’s sake,’ separate of any historic motifs or meanings. 

 Aesthetic style wallpaper design by Bruce James Talbert, c. 1878. Victoria & Albert Museum

Aesthetic style wallpaper design by Bruce James Talbert, c. 1878. Victoria & Albert Museum

In 1854, around the same time the Aesthetic Movement was becoming a big deal, Commodore Perry and the US navy bullied Japan into a trading agreement with the United States. 

 A Japanese woodblock portrait of Commodore Perry c. 1854 ... he wasn't necessarily Japan's favorite guy...

A Japanese woodblock portrait of Commodore Perry c. 1854 ... he wasn't necessarily Japan's favorite guy...

Beautiful Japanese artwork that had rarely been seen in the West was suddenly available at boutiques and world fairs across Europe and America.

 'Evening Snow at Kambara' by Utagawa Hiroshige, woodblock c. 1834. 

'Evening Snow at Kambara' by Utagawa Hiroshige, woodblock c. 1834. 

Those inclined towards the Aesthetic aesthetic were enamored, and Western takes on Japanese art appeared on everything from teapots to jewelry. Many striking aesthetic-style jewels were fabricated in silver, and feature japanesque motifs like fans, flowers, bamboo and birds engraved on bold, geometric silver pieces. Oftentimes colored gold details were applied on top of the silver in imitation of Japanese shakudo work. 

This aesthetic chain and locket are currently in our cases at Gray & Davis.

The addition of delicate engraving on such large-and-in-charge pieces makes for quite a statement, even today.