Jewelry Through the Ages @ the V&A

A visit to the jewelry collection at London’s Victoria & Albert Museum should be on the bucket list of any antique and vintage jewelry lover. The 3,000+ piece collection is a veritable trip back in time, offering the opportunity to see jewelry history from 1500BC to today, and the designs and trends that influenced our favorite pieces from the Georgian, Victorian, and Art Deco periods.

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The museum’s collection is a testament to both craftsmanship and care. Most pieces are in excellent condition and several were donated from what must have been spectacular personal collections. It’s easy to be entranced as you learn about the evolution of design and gemstone cutting, and the expansion of materials available to craftsmen through the ages – as shown by the pieces themselves.

Curators did not scrimp on the details: each case provides information on notable historical and cultural events that steered trends, such as why iron jewelry was created during the Napoleonic Wars, and brief biographies of influential craftsmen and designers. For those who crave item specifics, each case has a binder with a complete listing for each piece.

Etruscan gold rosette made in Tuscany c. 500-400 BC. 

Etruscan gold rosette made in Tuscany c. 500-400 BC. 

Gold earrings made by Castellani's student Carlo Giuliano c. 1865.

Gold earrings made by Castellani's student Carlo Giuliano c. 1865.

To first see original Etruscan gold granulated wire work c.300 BC, and Castellani’s 19th century Etruscan Revival cannatile jewelry later on, is a real treat. Other collection highlights include incredibly detailed ancient gold chains, the Canning Jewel (a merman brooch with a large natural pearl torso), Art Nouveau enamel designed by René Lalique, and floral diamond tiaras with moving parts (en tremblant) for extra sparkle.

The Canning Jewel, most likely of European origin c. 1800-1865, with enameled gold, natural pearls, table cut diamonds and Indian rubies.

The Canning Jewel, most likely of European origin c. 1800-1865, with enameled gold, natural pearls, table cut diamonds and Indian rubies.

Lalique enamel, opal and horn bodice ornament c. 1903

Lalique enamel, opal and horn bodice ornament c. 1903

Western European diamond tiara c. 1835

Western European diamond tiara c. 1835

Smaller exhibits are organized around different themes, bringing the jewelry’s symbolism and personal significance to life. “Cradle to the Grave” highlights materials and designs believed to be integral to different stages of life: from shell fertility amulets to protective figa pendants to jet and onyx mourning jewelry.

For those wanting to test their gemstone knowledge, a 154 piece collection donated to the museum in 1869 by Rev. Chauncy Hare Townshend displays a range of precious and semiprecious stones mounted in gorgeous rings. The swirling, colorful display of sapphires, tourmalines, garnets and more is a spectacular reminder that certain gemstones can surprise you in their range of naturally occurring colors.

The Townshend gemstone collection was supplemented by a donation from A. H. Church in 1913. Church also compiled the first catalog of the museum's collection.

The Townshend gemstone collection was supplemented by a donation from A. H. Church in 1913. Church also compiled the first catalog of the museum's collection.

It’s also worth it to watch the intermittent video demonstrations, showing how artisans craft items such as enamel jewelry and pocket watch casings. Sadly, museum staff strictly enforce a no photography policy, so while you can’t take any pictures of your favorite pieces, an afternoon learning about them in this temple to personal adornment is a truly wondrous experience.

Egyptian Revival Plique Bracelet

The Bracelet-

Some pieces are amazing because they are comprised of incredible materials, some because they are  difficult to create, and some because they can tell a story about a minute in history. This is one of those pieces.

A little back story- Discoveries of ancient artifacts have strongly influenced jewel making and there were two great periods of Egyptian revival. In the 1860’s the French were excavating for the Suez Canal and discovered Egyptian jewelry. It was so wonderfully exotic and unique it quickly became a popular trend and was reproduced in all shapes and sizes. In 1922 King Tut’s tomb was discovered and again brought the Egyptian style to the spotlight.

This bracelet dates to this later period of Egyptian Revival. It is silver, and has hallmarks indicating it was made in Cairo, Egypt and was imported into Nice, France in the early part of the 20th century, presumably the 1920’s. The Pliqué a Jour enamel and the imagery is just spectacular and even better we know what it means!

All the imagery of this bracelet actually depicts King Tutankhamun and findings within his tomb.

Starting on the Left- A painted alabaster unguent jar with a crouching lion on the lid. This jar would have been used to hold cosmetics and was found in King Tut’s tomb.

Bracelet; close up of cosmetic jar

Bracelet; close up of cosmetic jar

Actual cosmetic jar found in Tut's tomb

Actual cosmetic jar found in Tut's tomb

The next; Tutankhamun & Ankhesenamun, wife of King Tutankhamun, she anoints her young husband in this image which forms the back of a gilded chair. She is the half-sister of Tutankhamun, daughter of Nefertiti and Akhenaten. The chair with this scene was discovered in his tomb.

Bracelet; close up of Tut and his lady

Bracelet; close up of Tut and his lady

Actual image painted on guilded chair in King Tut's tomb

Actual image painted on guilded chair in King Tut's tomb

The central plaque is of King Tut himself! He is holding a crook and a flail. They were originally the attributes of the deity Osiris that became insignia of pharaonic authority. The shepherd's crook stood for kingship and the flail for the fertility of the land.

Bracelet; close up of Tut's sarcophagus

Bracelet; close up of Tut's sarcophagus

Tut's actual sarcophagus

Tut's actual sarcophagus

Moving right along is a war scene showing Tut vanquishing Nubians and Syrians. Tutankhamun is in a chariot leading the Egyptian forces. This was painted on a wooden box also found in his tomb.

Bracelet; Close up of war scene

Bracelet; Close up of war scene

Actual wooden box in King Tut's tomb

Actual wooden box in King Tut's tomb

Lastly  a lovely Unguent vase. . Elongated vase flanked with floral openwork ornamentation, cut from a single block of alabaster. Presumably used as a perfume bottle which was also found in the tomb.

Bracelet; Close up of perfume bottle 

Bracelet; Close up of perfume bottle 

Actual object in King Tut's Tomb

Actual object in King Tut's Tomb

The story and the work make this just a wonderful piece of wearable history and we are lucky to have it in our shop. 

Say YES to Wednesday 2.32 ctw Moi et Toi

True, it is not Wednesday but I just couldn't help  myself?! This beau is too lovely to wait a whole week for some attention and plus with all this snow we could use a little cheer!

Fabulous Platinum and diamond twin or Moi et Toi Art Deco ring with bright old European cut diamonds. One diamond is approx .96 carats, I-J color and VS2 clarity and the other approx 1.08 carats I-J color as well and VS2 clarity.  Lovely single cut diamonds and baguettes embellish the center with just the perfect amount of negative space. Design is both modern and interesting with milligrain texture. Approx 2.32ctw. Serious sparkle factor....Would you say YES?!

SJP Golden Globes

Every once in a while, a girl has to indulge herself.
— Carrie Bradshaw, Sex and the City
Image Source: Getty / Venturelli

We adore Sarah Jessica Parker because she taught us not only about shoes but also the importance of friendship, true love and yes fashion.  She is a….wait no, let’s re-phrase- she is the style icon of this century and we were totally flattered when she wore a Gray & Davis piece to the Golden Globes. 

Retro diamond ring glittering with old mine cut diamonds in platinum and 18k yellow gold. These diamonds likely lived in a brooch before they were re-imagined as part of this incredible ring. The four center diamonds in a north-south arrangement are 0.57ct, H/VS2; 1.04ct, J/VS2; 0.72ct, J/SI2; and 0.56ct, I/SI1. The additional 26 old mine cut diamonds have an approximate carat weight of 3.52ctw, bringing the total carat weight of this spectacular ring to 6.41ctw. All stones are set in platinum. This stunning ring was made c.1940.

The Art of Hand Engraving

Engraving is a technique as old as the hills. Tiny slivers of metal are cut away from the surface of a piece of jewelry to create a texture, pattern or images. This seemingly simple process can transform a piece from boring to extraordinary. The tools used are simple and have changed little over the centuries, but it takes years of practice and dedication to master them. 

Today truly expert hand-engravers are few and far between, and we count ourselves fortunate to have an old-school engraving artist in our arsenal of craftsmen.