Something Old, Something New...

What’s a wedding without the inclusion of a few of the quirky traditions espoused by families and folklore? 

 Art Deco Diamond Brooch, modern pave wedding band, antique gold locket and turquoise & diamond Victorian ring.

Art Deco Diamond Brooch, modern pave wedding band, antique gold locket and turquoise & diamond Victorian ring.

One of the more persistent traditions in our own culture is a bride’s adherence to the fashion tips of an odd little poem. She must wear:

Something old

Something new

Something borrowed

Something blue

And, if the poem is read in its entirety, she should also be sure to have:

A silver sixpence in her shoe

These words have long held sway over wedding day ensembles. In 1888 Bow Bells Weekly of London reported “Last season there were probably not three society brides who had the courage to disregard the rhyme.”

The author and origin of the poem are today a History Mystery, but most will point to 19th century England as the time and place these verses first gained widespread popularity. The five recommended objects were meant to help the wearer on her way to a happy and healthy marriage.

Something Old represents the support of the bride’s own family,

Something New is for the family she and her husband will create

Something Borrowed should come from a friend or relative with a joyful marriage, a little piece of luck to pass along

Something Blue represents love and fidelity

A Sixpence in her shoe is a token towards a prosperous future

While there are some wedding day customs we wouldn’t mind saying goodbye to (smashing cake in your partner’s professionally made-up face, for instance), the tradition of Something Old is one that represents only good; the past, present and future of a couple and those who will support them on their journey. And besides, who couldn’t use a bit of extra luck every now and then?