Easter Eggs at the Fabergé Museum

From 1885 to 1916, the last two tsars of Russia commissioned fifty jeweled eggs as Easter gifts for their wives and mothers. Made in the workshops of  Peter Carl Fabergé, these fabulous objects have become world famous as both masterful examples of the jeweler's art and symbols of over-the-top opulence. After the execution of the Russian royal family in 1918, the eggs were dispersed all over the globe. Today, the largest collection of eggs is housed in the Fabergé Museum in St. Petersburg. Here they are in all their glory:

 Imperial Coronation Easter Egg, 1897

Imperial Coronation Easter Egg, 1897

 Bay Tree Easter Egg, 1911

Bay Tree Easter Egg, 1911

 Rosebud Easter Egg, 1895. 

Rosebud Easter Egg, 1895. 

 Order of St. George Easter Egg, 1916. 

Order of St. George Easter Egg, 1916. 

 Hen Easter Egg, 1895. 

Hen Easter Egg, 1895. 

 Resurrection Easter Egg, 1886 - 1898. 

Resurrection Easter Egg, 1886 - 1898. 

 Cockerel Easter Egg, 1900. 

Cockerel Easter Egg, 1900. 

 Fifteenth Anniversary Easter Egg, 1911. 

Fifteenth Anniversary Easter Egg, 1911. 

 Lilies-of-the-Valley Easter Egg, 1898 

Lilies-of-the-Valley Easter Egg, 1898 

 Renaissance Easter Egg Jewelry Box, 1894.

Renaissance Easter Egg Jewelry Box, 1894.

If St. Petersburg, Russia seems like a bit of a trek, we recommend at least visiting the museum's website, where you can read the individual stories of these infamous eggs.