Cocktail Bling: A ring a ding ding!

There are rings designed to catch the eye, and then there are rings designed to ensnare it!

The cocktail ring, so named for the trend of wearing one while wielding a martini glass, came into fashion when drinking cocktails went underground. In the United States, prohibition of alcohol sale and consumption was passed as part of the 18th Amendment in 1920. It became popular to attend highly illegal, and thus highly fashionable, cocktail parties dressed in your flapper best. 

Art Deco platinum and 1.54ct diamond ring, EGL certified, with calibre cut sapphires and single cut diamond accents, at Gray & Davis.

Art Deco platinum and 1.54ct diamond ring, EGL certified, with calibre cut sapphires and single cut diamond accents, at Gray & Davis.

Early 20th Century emerald and diamond ring in platinum and 18k yellow gold, at Gray & Davis. 

Early 20th Century emerald and diamond ring in platinum and 18k yellow gold, at Gray & Davis. 

The classically defined cocktail ring featured a boldly colored center stone weighing at least 3 carats, surrounded by diamonds or other gems. It is said that those wearing the biggest stones went to the best parties, a true statement piece of jewelry. Some rings featured geometric design that has become a staple of Art Deco pieces, with calibre cut sapphires and ruby accents.

After a (totally reasonable) hiatus during the Great Depression and WW2, the cocktail ring made a comeback in the 1950s and 1960s when entertaining came back into fashion. If you are looking for an eye-grabbing accessory for your night on the town, remember that vintage cocktail rings have been making a statement for almost a century! These rings were specifically designed to party.